Sensations: They’re All about Perspective

Sensations: They’re All about Perspective


Zack Dumont

As a physiological function, sight sure gets a bad rap. Although it is usually criticized for taking away from the other senses, we close our eyes to truly hear, feel, taste, and smell. Conversely, when it comes to sight, the other senses seemingly serve to enhance.

In recent months, the Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists (CSHP) leadership has been exercising many forms of information gathering to enhance the vision for our Society (see Tania Mysak’s recent presidential commentary, “Daring To Be Different”, Can J Hosp Pharm. 2019;72[6]:470). We’ve been sniffing around—following hot leads to determine potential opportunities and prepare for threats. We’ve been tasting—taking in CSHP conferences (puns regarding the conference-related dietary excess are welcome), devouring the Journal’s content, and experiencing all Society products and services. We’ve been listening—a member survey, an inclusive strategic planning summit, and now a series of Town Halls, starting at the Professional Practice Conference, have allowed us to hear from members regarding pharmacy issues. And lastly, I’ll request permission to stretch the analogy for a worthy cause, using “touch” as a symbol of caring: we’ve remained cognizant of who this is all for, the patient.

While the new strategic plan nears launch, CSHP has been undergoing a number of changes. We’re evaluating every process to ensure we’re doing things for the right reasons and not simply “because they’ve always been done that way”. Contemporary user-friendly technology solutions are being designed to better connect members with one another (e.g., Pharmacy Specialty Networks) and stakeholders (e.g., a new website). Old services are being replaced with better member-centred options. Further, our committees have undergone a review and realignment to ensure volunteers’ time and effort is spent on strategy, while the office takes the reins on the operations. While change can sting, these actions ultimately aim to “please the senses” in time.

On that note, our line of sight cannot remain fixed solely on the short term. We’re positioning the Society for significant growth within the next several years, so that you have a community with whom you can tackle hospital pharmacy issues far into the future. Speaking of which, what is your vision, not just for your Society, but for your pharmacy profession? How confident are you that it is shared by your neighbour at the other hospital, in the next region, or the province one over? How certain are you that your vision considers all points of view? A strong vision for Canadian hospital pharmacy depends on incorporating as many perspectives as possible. From primary care clinics to hospitals large and small; women, men, and others; Canadian-born and newly arrived; young professionals and experienced—the more inclusive and diverse the contribution, the more incontrovertible the vision. If there’s ever been a time when we need to hear from the entirety of our stakeholders, the time is now. We want to hear from all our current members and bring more aboard. We must foster a safe environment that encourages members to speak up. And we should have the best processing unit ready to receive those messages and turn them into something greater. One of our new committees—Pharmacy Practice Vision—is being inaugurated to catalyze this process. Stay tuned for opportunities to help shape our profession.

 


 

Prepare for razor-sharp focus over these next few years, and together we’ll strive toward that vision for the Society and for all of hospital pharmacy. If we’re using all senses to remain open to a collective perspective, then sight—vision—can be sensational.


Zack Dumont, BSP, ACPR, MS(Pharm), is President Elect and Internal Liaison for the Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists

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Canadian Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, VOLUME 73, NUMBER 2, March-April 2020



ISSN 1920-2903 (Online)
Copyright © 2019 Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists